Chief Black Hawk, Confederate President Jefferson Finis Davis, President Abraham Lincoln, The Black Hawk War

President Abraham Lincoln and Confederate President Jefferson Davis – Veterans Of “The Black Hawk War”

Painting of Chief Back Hawk.

In the 1830s, Chief Black Hawk asked for food for his tribe but was not given any from a U.S. Government office. In response to this grievance, in addition to others he occurred, he attempted to unite several Indian tribes against the Americans who had taken their tribal lands.

Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis we’re both enlisted in the U.S. Army and were called to served in the Black Hawk War.

Author’s Note:

Zachary Taylor was also a veteran of the Black Hawk War.

Confederate President Jefferson Finis Davis, Kilpatrick-Dahlgren Raid, The Dahlgren Affair

Plans To Assassinate Confederate President Jefferson Davis Found In Union Colonel Ulric Dahlgren’s Pockets After The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren Raid

Painting of the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren Raid.

From February 28 to March 1, 1864 Union Brigadier General H. Judson Kilpatrick and Colonel Ulric Dahlgren launched failed a calvary ambush of Richmond, Virginia known as the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren Raid and as “The Dahlgren Affair”.

The union forces were repeatedly attacked, after retreating from Richmond, on their way to northern Virignia.

Union Colonel Ulric Dahlgren lead 200 troops during the retreat, to King and Queen County, Virginia. Colonel Dahlgren was shot and a thirteen year old boy found a letter describing plans to assassinate Confederate President Jefferson Davis. The plans were published in Confederate newspapers and Colonel Dahlgren’s body was hung in public display in Richmond.

Photograph of Union Colonel Ulric Dahlgren.

As retaliation, the Confederate government planned to kidnap Lincoln and to set explosives in the White House. Both plans had failed, just as the union plan to kill Jefferson Davis had failed.

Confederate President Jefferson Finis Davis, First White House of the Confederacy, Richmond, Virginia

The Second White House Of The Confederacy

From Febuary 1861 to late May 1861, Confederate President Jefferson Davis had the First White House of the Confederacy In Montgomery, Alabama. In the summer of 1861, the executive residence of the confederacy was moved to Richmond, Virginia, less than 100 miles from the U.S. White House, as a strategic move.

After the Union army, under General Grant’s command, invaded and burned down several parts of Richmond, Virginia the confederate government moved it’s capital to its third and last location of Danville, Virginia.

The confederate government operated in Danville, Virginia, for a mere eight days, until Jefferson Davis was captured and the confederate bureaucracy surrendered.

In present day the White House of the Confederacy is a musuem and the grounds around the house is a U.S. National Park.

The musuem has exhibits on several problems that the Confederate government had with its civilian population, including a bread riot that had occurred.

The confederate government often paid less than the actual value for food, or simply seized food, to feed the army.

In addition, Confederate citizens were subject to taxes on bank deposits and an graduated income tax. Businesses has taxes on business licenses and farmers had to pay a ten percent tax on everything they earned. These taxes caused resentment with the civilian population against their government.

Here is a documentary on the artifacts within the White House of the Confederacy.

Confederate President Jefferson Finis Davis, President James Monroe, The Hollywood Cemetery Of Richmond, Virginia

The Hollywood Cemetery Of Richmond, Virginia

The Hollywood Cemetery of Richmond, Virginia hosts the graves of Revolutionary War Veteran and U.S. President Monroe, War of 1812 Veteran and U.S. President John Tyler, as well as the grave of Confederate President Jefferson Finis Davis.

Gravesite of President James Monroe.

Gravesite of Confederate President Jefferson Finis Davis.

After the end of the Civil War, a Confederate Memorial Pyramid was established in the Hollywood Cemetery to honor the fallen soldiers and sailors of the southern military. The Confederate Memorial Pyramid was built out of granite rock from the James River.

Memorial Day gathering at the Confederate Pyramid In 1890.

The original grave marker for President John Tyler in 1900.
The Hollywood Cemetery grounds in 1900.

The cemetery had various other notable individuals within its grounds as well.

Author’s Note:

Philip Hamilton visited the Hollywood Cemetery in February 2018.